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WOMXN FROM THE MOUNTAIN

A Womxn-led Indigenous Non-Profit working to clean and protect our communities and our Biosphere.

 
Learning to love myself in my full femin

Restorative Justice starts with Rematriating

Womxn from the Mountain Founded | 2018
Inclusive women’s group open to women of all colors and backgrounds, including those that identify as women and the feminine identity. Our goal is to empower our individual, spiritual, physical, emotional, and educational needs directly supporting the Colorado indigenous and disproportionately impacted community through transformative art healing.
We provide cultural enrichment in diverse communities including holding safe spaces for cultural traditions of Danza Azteca de ColorAztlan, transformative indigenous education, braves spaces for cultural representation, and campaigns to address awareness and bring enforceable protections with cultural and trauma sensitivity to issues in the indigenous communities such as; Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, domestic violence, drug/homeless/mental health support, support for asylum seekers, and environmental awareness.
Currently working as climate change organizers and cultural educators for disproportionately impacted communities to create protections from cumulative impacts of environmental racism. We have worked on SB 1266 and now, on the first ever in Colorado, Environmental Justice Task Force in current policies to transformatively address climate change with authentic equity.
Worked with CU Environmental Justice Department, March On, Future Coalition, 350.org., International Indigenous Youth Council, Conservation Colorado, and Western Conservation, to bring awareness for Murdered and Missing Indigenous People throughout Colorado and North America.

 
 

Reinforcing our Commitment

We offer Ally and Accomplice Trainings workshops for every level of community and educational level. And expand in a two part series of Restorative Justice Trainings. 

Reach out to find out pricing and book now at reneemchacon@gmail.com



We support the narrative Social Justice is Climate Justice because we are all connected socially, economically, and environmentally. With access to the right resources and platforms, people can become empowered by their own abilities and gain the confidence to fulfill their potential. Learn more about our work by getting in touch or contributing today.

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JOIN US AT PATAGONIA DENVER

RSVP to Filmscreening April 21,2022. 6:30pm

 

SUNCOR SUNDOWN

A short film about the impacts of Colorado's only oil refinery on our communities’ public health.

Suncor Energy, a Canadian company, runs an oil refinery north of Denver Colorado.  Suncor is one of Colorado’s largest emitters of  greenhouse gasses, as well as one of the largest emitters of toxic air pollutants, and has been operating without any changes to its operations or pollution controls for years.

In spite of numerous enforcement actions and settlements, Suncor continues to flout air quality laws, putting neighboring communities – who are primarily Latino and low income – at extreme risk.

This is their story.

 
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ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE NOW EVENTS

Public Comment Needed this week!!!

April 21, 2022, 9-10AM MST 

Air Quality Control Commission Public Meeting

Register to watch meeting via Zoom here: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUvduuorDMrGtTBSRPBv-g-1XvKtiLT92J1 

Description/Background: 


On April 21, the Air Quality Control Commission (AQCC) will consider a petition filed by environmental justice and other advocates to accelerate consideration of the Advanced Clean Trucks (ACT) and Low NOx Omnibus rules. See a fact sheet about ACT here, and a fact sheet about the Low NOx Omnibus Rule here. The groups, represented by EarthJustice, filed the petition in response to the Polis Administration's decision to postpone consideration of these rules until late 2022 and early 2023.  This delay is unnecessary, and will mean continued cumulative negative health impacts on Coloradans, especially for Black, Brown and Indigenous communities, which have suffered disproportionate levels of air pollution from fossil fuel power trucks, delivery vans and other larger vehicles.


Colorado’s transportation sector is the largest single emitter of dangerous greenhouse gas pollutants that cause climate change. Truck traffic, especially along major highway corridors in the Denver area and statewide, also contributes to other air pollutants that increase ozone and particulate matter pollution and Nitrous Oxide (NOx). These dangerous pollutants lead to higher rates of premature death, asthma and other respiratory diseases and other health concerns.


Members of our coalition include Denver NAACP, Mi Familia Vota, Colorado Working Families Party, GreenLatinos, Womxn From The Mountain, and Green Thumbs for Black Power.  Please help us get this message across to the Air Quality Control Commission by sending in a public comment. Instructions and draft public comments can be found below.


How to make a public comment:

  • If you have signed up to testify between 9 and 10 am on April 21, you can tailor your comments, based on suggestions below.  Please make sure that you are registered for the meeting, and be prepared to speak anytime between 9 and 10 am.

  • If you haven’t signed up, written comments can be emailed to: cdphe.aqcc-comments@state.co.us

  • Put in the subject line “Public Comment for 4/21/22 AQCC Meeting”

  • Alternatively, EarthJustice will collect, compile and submit collective comments to the AQCC.  Use this link to submit a comment to be a part of the EarthJustice comment compilation: https://earthjustice.org/action/demand-faster-action-for-clean-trucks-in-colorado?ms=coalition

  • Draft comments can be found below. You can send these comments as they are, but if possible, please adjust and personalize as you see fit. Tell your personal story if you have one. 



Draft Comments to Send:

To AQCC (Disproportionately Impacted Communities-Related):  

Please accept this petition; there’s no reason to delay until December.  In fact, delay until December will only add to the cumulative burden felt by disproportionately impacted communities (DICs) of Indigenous, Immigrant, Black and Brown families and children who suffer from higher rates of asthma, bronchitis, anemia, low birth rates, premature births, as well as other physical and mental health ailments due to the toxic pollution created along Colorado’s congested highways, especially I-70 and its surrounding corridors. Communities located near these transportation arteries, warehouses, and railyards experience the worst impacts from the heavy truck traffic that is exacerbated by idling, slow speeds, and frequent stops and little to no restoration and healthcare access. Colorado has the chance to address this environmental racism while also reducing emissions by adopting and implementing the toughest, most aggressive clean truck strategy as soon as possible.

Children are dying. Entire communities, mostly Brown and Black folks, are suffering in “diesel death zones”. An injustice anywhere, is an injustice everywhere. Our communities cannot wait any longer for clean air.  We can’t wait to have an aggressive plan to clean up truck exhaust as soon as possible.


To AQCC (Public Health-Related):


The AQCC needs to act as quickly as possible on clean trucks.  Colorado’s transportation sector is the largest single emitter of dangerous greenhouse gas pollutants that cause climate change. Truck traffic, especially along major highway corridors in the Denver area and statewide, also contributes to other air pollutants that increase ozone and particulate matter pollution and Nitrous Oxide (NOx). These dangerous pollutants lead to higher rates of premature death, asthma and other respiratory diseases and other health concerns, especially for Black, Brown and Indigenous families. 


A strong plan to cut truck exhaust in our communities would reduce adverse health impacts, improve air quality throughout the state, and finally recognize known harms from particulate pollution, especially in areas along major transportation corridors which are disproportionately impacted by truck emissions. This will deliver major public health benefits in the heavily populated zip codes that include north metro Denver, Adams County, and Weld County - these areas suffer from some of the most unhealthy air in the entire U.S. This is an issue that is affecting these communities now; we cannot delay these efforts because our citizens, our children are suffering now. 


Thank you for your consideration, 

INSERT NAME



To AQCC (Redlining-Related):


Don’t delay any more your consideration and approval of the Advanced Clean Truck and Low NOx rules.  The development of the I-70 corridor provides a good example of predatory behaviors on Disproportionately Impacted Communities. Residential Security Maps (RSMs) were a tool historically used by the Federal Housing Administration to decide which homes got mortgages, and which did not. The RSMs rated neighborhoods from green “desirable”, to red “undesirable” in a process known as “redlining.” Black and Brown people were segregated out of the desirable White neighborhoods and relegated to the neighborhoods marked in red. The Elyria Swansea neighborhood was redlined in 1938, 23 years before the first segment of I-70 construction within the city of Denver began. If you look at a map of Denver, you can see that I-70 takes a curious jog to the north as it goes through the city. In 1961, the city leaders made a choice. Rather than continuing the path of construction through what is now East Colfax, or creating a beltway around the city limits, city leaders took a shortcut, deviating construction north before continuing east to run through Elyria Swansea. Had they deviated the same distance to the south, the highway would have run through affluent Glendale.

The City of Denver chose to sacrifice the health and safety of Black and Brown children, creating what is now known as the Diesel Death Zone, instead of finding a more equitable solution that would have benefited everyone. Today, these children pay the price with the time that they are not in school and cannot play outside due to the higher frequency of hazardous air days, with their safety as they cross to different parts of town to spend time with friends and family, and in some cases, with their very lives due to asthma, bronchitis, and cancer. 

These communities cannot afford to wait any longer. We cannot continue to sacrifice the health of Black and Brown children for our highway systems. Medium- and heavy-duty (M/HD) trucks and vans are the second-largest source of GHG emissions in the transportation sector, contributing 22% of on-road GHG emissions, despite comprising less than 10% of Colorado vehicles. They are also a significant source of emissions like Nitrogen Oxides and Particulate Matter (NOx and PM) that lead to ozone and have serious impacts on air quality and human health. M/HD vehicles are estimated to contribute about 30% of on-road NOx emissions and 40% of on-road PM emissions.

Thank you for your consideration, and for standing up for environmental justice.

Best,

INSERT NAME 



To AQCC (Electric Trucks/Vans-Related):

Medium- and heavy-duty (M/HD) trucks and vans are the second-largest source of GHG emissions in the transportation sector, contributing 22% of on-road GHG emissions, despite comprising less than 10% of Colorado vehicles. They are also a significant contributor of emissions like Nitrogen Oxides and Particulate Matter (NOx and PM) that lead to ozone and have serious impacts on air quality and human health. M/HD vehicles are estimated to contribute about 30% of on-road NOx emissions and 40% of on-road PM emissions.

The Advanced Clean Truck and Low NOx rules will lead to cleaner trucks on our roadways and warehouse districts.  It is critical that we move as quickly as possible to reduce emissions from trucks, and to encourage more electric trucks and vans. That also means that smart infrastructure improvements must be made quickly, in every neighborhood in the Denver Metro Area and across the state, so that charging stations will be located in convenient places.




Draft Social Posts (post on social pages from April 19-20):


  • Our children are dying. Entire communities, mostly Brown & Black folks, live in “diesel death zones”. We need to clean up pollution from trucks now. An injustice anywhere, is an injustice everywhere. Accelerate ACT!

  • The Air Quality Control Commission wants to hear from you about how to cut pollution from fleets, school buses and other large trucks. Clean air & a healthy climate depend on cutting pollution from these vehicles. Tell the state what you think by commenting here:  

  • The Colorado AQCC is considering rules to clean up trucks, and help clear the air.  Let them know they should act without any more delay.

  • Our communities can’t afford to wait for elected leaders to take action to improve air quality. The ACT is a step in the right direction. Click here to tell the Air Quality Control Commission what cleaner air means to you and your loved ones: 

  • Last year, Colorado set a new record of 65 ozone action days, where the air was unhealthy to breathe. It is past time for the Air Quality Control Commission to step up and fight for the health of our communities. Advance the ACT rule NOW!

  • From the peaks of 14ers to the fields of the Eastern Plains, poor air quality is threatening our Colorado way of life. But we have the power to change that. Sign up to tell the Air Quality Control Commission why you want them to adopt the ACT. 

  • Did you know that the EPA just classified the Front Range as a “severe” violator of ozone standards? The longer leaders wait to take action to improve air quality, the more our lungs and wallets suffer. We need the Advanced Clean Truck (ACT) rule. 

  • The burden of air pollution isn’t shared equally - marginalized communities face higher exposure to pollutants and suffer the most severe consequences. We need the Air Quality Control Commission to support the ACT now. 

  • Colorado is falling behind on our bold climate goals. The Air Quality Control Commission wants to hear from you about how to cut pollution from trucks and school buses. Tell them what you think here:


Borrador de comentarios para enviar:

A AQCC (Comunidades desproporcionadamente afectadas):  

Por favor, acepte esta petición; no hay razón para retrasar hasta diciembre.  De hecho, el retraso hasta diciembre sólo aumentará la carga acumulada que sienten las comunidades desproporcionadamente impactadas (DIC) de familias y niños indígenas, inmigrantes, afroamericanos y morenos que sufren mayores tasas de asma, bronquitis, anemia, bajas tasas de natalidad, nacimientos prematuros, así como otras dolencias físicas y mentales debido a la contaminación tóxica creada a lo largo de las congestionadas autopistas de Colorado, especialmente la I-70 y sus corredores circundantes. Las comunidades situadas cerca de estas arterias de transporte, los almacenes y los astilleros experimentan los peores impactos del tráfico de camiones pesados que se ve exacerbado por el ralentí, la baja velocidad y las frecuentes paradas y el escaso o nulo acceso a la restauración y la atención sanitaria. Colorado tiene la oportunidad de hacer frente a este racismo medioambiental y, al mismo tiempo, reducir las emisiones adoptando y aplicando la estrategia más dura y agresiva de camiones limpios lo antes posible.

Los niños están muriendo. Comunidades enteras, en su mayoría marrones y afroamericanos, están sufriendo en las "zonas de muerte del diesel". Una injusticia en cualquier lugar, es una injusticia en todas partes. Nuestras comunidades no pueden esperar más por un aire limpio.  No podemos esperar a tener un plan agresivo para limpiar los gases de los camiones lo antes posible.



A la AQCC (relacionada con la salud pública):

La AQCC tiene que actuar lo más rápidamente posible sobre los camiones limpios.  El sector del transporte de Colorado es el mayor emisor de gases contaminantes de efecto invernadero peligrosos que causan el cambio climático. El tráfico de camiones, especialmente a lo largo de los principales corredores de carreteras en el área de Denver y en todo el estado, también contribuye a otros contaminantes del aire que aumentan el ozono y la contaminación por partículas y el óxido nitroso (NOx). Estos peligrosos contaminantes provocan mayores tasas de muerte prematura, asma y otras enfermedades respiratorias y otros problemas de salud, especialmente para las familias afroamericanos, marrones e indígenas. 

Un plan sólido para reducir los gases de escape de los camiones en nuestras comunidades reduciría los impactos adversos en la salud, mejoraría la calidad del aire en todo el estado y finalmente reconocería los daños conocidos de la contaminación por partículas, especialmente en las áreas a lo largo de los principales corredores de transporte que se ven desproporcionadamente afectados por las emisiones de los camiones. Esto proporcionará importantes beneficios para la salud pública en los códigos postales densamente poblados que incluyen el norte del área metropolitana de Denver, el condado de Adams y el condado de Weld - estas áreas sufren de uno de los aires más insalubres de todo Estados Unidos. 

Gracias por su consideración, 

INSERTAR NOMBRE



A la AQCC (Redlining-Related):

No retrase más su consideración y aprobación de las normas Advanced Clean Truck y Low NOx.  El desarrollo del corredor de la I-70 proporciona un buen ejemplo de comportamientos depredadores sobre las Comunidades Desproporcionadamente Impactadas. Los Mapas de Seguridad Residencial (RSM) fueron una herramienta utilizada históricamente por la Administración Federal de la Vivienda para decidir qué viviendas obtenían hipotecas y cuáles no. Los RSM clasificaban los barrios de verde "deseable", a rojo "indeseable" en un proceso conocido como "redlining". Los afroamericanos y morenos fueron segregados de los barrios blancos deseables y relegados a los barrios marcados en rojo. El barrio de Elyria Swansea fue marcado en rojo en 1938, 23 años antes de que comenzara la construcción del primer tramo de la I-70 dentro de la ciudad de Denver. Si se observa un mapa de Denver, se puede ver que la I-70 da un curioso salto hacia el norte a medida que atraviesa la ciudad. En 1961, los dirigentes de la ciudad tomaron una decisión. En lugar de continuar el camino de la construcción a través de lo que ahora es East Colfax, o de crear una circunvalación alrededor de los límites de la ciudad, los dirigentes de la ciudad tomaron un atajo, desviando la construcción hacia el norte antes de continuar hacia el este para pasar por Elyria Swansea. Si se hubieran desviado la misma distancia hacia el sur, la autopista habría atravesado el próspero Glendale.

La ciudad de Denver optó por sacrificar la salud y la seguridad de los niños negros y marrones, creando lo que ahora se conoce como la Zona de la Muerte del Diesel, en lugar de encontrar una solución más equitativa que hubiera beneficiado a todos. Hoy en día, estos niños pagan el precio con el tiempo que no están en la escuela y no pueden jugar al aire libre debido a la mayor frecuencia de días de aire peligroso, con su seguridad al cruzar a diferentes partes de la ciudad para pasar tiempo con amigos y familiares, y en algunos casos, con sus propias vidas debido al asma, la bronquitis y el cáncer. 

Estas comunidades no pueden permitirse esperar más. No podemos seguir sacrificando la salud de los niños negros y marrones por nuestros sistemas de carreteras. Los camiones y furgonetas de carga media y pesada (M/HD) son la segunda mayor fuente de emisiones de GEI en el sector del transporte, contribuyendo con el 22% de las emisiones de GEI en carretera, a pesar de constituir menos del 10% de los vehículos de Colorado. También son una fuente importante de emisiones como los óxidos de nitrógeno y las partículas (NOx y PM) que provocan ozono y tienen graves repercusiones en la calidad del aire y la salud humana. Se calcula que los vehículos M/HD contribuyen a un 30% de las emisiones de NOx en carretera y a un 40% de las emisiones de PM en carretera.

Gracias por su consideración y por defender la justicia medioambiental.

Le deseo lo mejor,

INSERTAR NOMBRE 

“If we build a society on honoring the Earth, we build a society which is sustainable, and has the capacity to support all life forms. ”

Winona LaDuke

 

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Get in touch with Womxn From The Mountain to learn more about our work and how you can get involved.

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